October Interviews – Graeme!

Once again, I am several people behind and have to do a blitzkrieg of updates. I swear it is because I have been writing / reformatting and not because I’m just really bad at posting. *cough*

Quick side note – I would love, love some fresh Amazon reviews for my books. If you’re interested, comment down below or email me. You can choose from any of my works. Currently available I have The Age of Waking Death series (books 1, 2, and 3), Mr. Fingers, and Baron of Blood. For a more details on the individual books type C.N. Faust into Amazon.com and check out my author page!

All right now ONTO THE INTERVIEWS. Here we hand the mic to Graeme, in case you didn’t read the title…

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Did you and Encarz ever get along?

We might have, if we had ever crossed paths. Very seldom did we ever run into each other in the great halls of our castle. That is what happens when two brothers lead completely separate lives. Encarz was the heir, the favorite, the soldier. Everything he did was excellent and he was a gleaming figure in the public eye. I preferred my books. After some time I devoted myself entirely to learning magic, since I was no cleric or godsborn and never possessed the natural ability. There was a time when I tried to share my findings or interests with Encarz, but he never seemed to care much at the time. He always retained the information for later when he needed something from me. I remember, growing up, that I always wanted to be just like my older brother. I wanted little more than his approval and companionship for a long time.

What was it like growing up with your brother?

As I mentioned, we didn’t really cross paths. I didn’t grow up with him so much as grow up in his shadow. It was always easy to hear about his exploits, his slaughters, his achievements… but I did not know much about the man. He never seemed interested in getting close to me. And of course… mother showered all of her attention on him. I was touch-starved and hungry for any grain of affection I could receive. If my father ever hit me, it was a blessing. At least someone knew I was there and felt something stronger than indifference.

How did your relationship with your mother evolve as you grew up?

She lost Encarz, eventually. She fell to me at first to get revenge, then to cradle her bruised ego. She knew I was always there for her, that I would never have abandoned her no matter how much I resented her for ignoring me all those years. I was her loyal lapdog. My magic became of some use to her when she wanted an untraceable poison that would make my father suffer as much as possible before his death. I admit, I was reluctant to aid in Prokopios’ death. But by the time she approached me, his mind was already deteriorating, and he barely knew me.

What made you get started in magic? What do you like most about practicing?

Loneliness was the main reason. I needed something to fill my time as an extra son. I thought briefly about becoming a cleric but that life did not appeal to me, and over the years I became increasingly cynical and less religious. Malhii eventually excommunicated me, and that was fine. He always hated me anyway. What I enjoy most about practicing is the satisfaction in mastering a spell. There are a few fleeting moments of feeling like the most powerful person in the world. When that feeling is gone, you want it back. Magic is as much an addiction as any drug.

Have you ever fallen with someone other than your mother?

I would like to make it clear that I do not consider myself to be in love with my mother. I do love her, but in the way a desperate orphan will cling to the skirts of the matron who beats him just to feel some kind of affection. That being said, I was in love once. I was deeply in love with Anastasia Nicos. Some know her better as Encarz’s first wife and the mother of Pharun. When Anastasia married Encarz, I was consumed by such hurt that I had an affair with her younger sister, Fatima. We were not careful, and she conceived my child. That was a year or two after Pharun’s birth. By then her family was already in disgrace that they could not handle another disappointing daughter. They disowned her, and she came to me. I tried to use my knowledge to get rid of the baby… but by then it was too far along. Instead of the baby dying, Fatima ended up giving birth early, and the baby survived. She, however, did not. I kept the baby in secret for as long as I could, passing him between nursemaids and sympathetic servants. As he grew older, he was just seen as another servant’s boy. I used a spell to change his eye color for his protection. The spell will fade, eventually, and then he and everyone else will know. I pray he will still be protected by then. My one regret is that I was never able to tell him of his lineage.

October Interviews – Ekaterini!

More interview catching up!! Image credit: dashinvaine

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What was Encarz’s father like? How did you two meet?

My husband, Prokopios, was exactly as you would expect. He was a weak man who overcompensated for his shortcomings with feigned ambition and cruelty. When I was young, too young to marry, I was given to be his wife. Had I a choice, I would have never married such a fool.

What was Encarz’s relationship with his father? Was there one?

Prokopios was too busy stirring up minor skirmishes with his barons and pretending to be king. When he did pay attention to his sons, it was only to inflict pain and abuse. He was often drunk and he had a temper that was quick to combust. He made sure they hated him.

What was Encarz like growing up?

He was a good boy. He loved his mother. He was a fine man, a good warrior, a sharp thinker. He was intelligent beyond his years but always very down-to-earth. I appreciated that he was not a man of nonsense – not like his brother. Graeme was always an inspired mind and a very dull child.

Do you take your murder personally?

Of course I do. What kind of ungrateful, terrible boy kills his own mother who gave him the world? He could have been so happy if he had just trusted me as he used to.

What was it like ruling as a woman in Dragoloth?

Very difficult. Everyone wants to make you jump through as many hoops as possible. Perhaps if i had taken things over in a different way it could have been another story.

Describe a time when you put a man in his place.

Besides the time when I made my husband swallow poison, and then had him buried while he was still breathing? (Something they don’t tell you, in the history books).

When did you first get a taste of real power?

As soon as Prokopios died, and I could breathe again as a woman who was not controlled by her husband.

October Interviews – Olympia!

Cy is behind – Cy is very behind in posting, responding, and everything else! I’m also behind on these interviews. So here we go – Blitzkrieg catch-up!!

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What was it like growing into a woman in Dragoloth?

I was ignored through much of my childhood. Pharun was a pain in the ass and Shrukian was father’s pride. I was confined to  my nurses and my embroidery. Dragolothian women are not often taught how to read, but one sympathetic tutor educated me in modern letters, though I cannot read the ancient ones.

When did you and Shrukian start to become more than brother and sister?

He was sixteen, I think, I was nearly nineteen. He was such a beautiful man, then, young and fresh with new muscles. You would not be able to ignore him, either, if he were living just down the hall from you.

When Encarz found out about you and Shrukian, how did he react?

At first he wanted to discourage it heavily, but then he started to ignore it. I think he knew that there was nothing he could do to make it stop… and Shrukian meant so much to him that he would have pulled down the moon to put on his cloak pin if he thought it would make his son happy.

What do you have to say to all of your haters (like me ;p)?

You don’t know a strong woman when you see one, and if you do then you must resent them. You don’t know anything about my life and you have no right to judge me.

GUEST Q&A – poet, Aleksis Faust!

Hello my beautiful ones! Today I asked my husband Aleksis Faust to guest post and do a Q&A for my blog. I wrote the questions and he answered them all in private, so I was just as entertained reading them for the first time as you will be. I won’t keep his stage for long, so here he is ! If you enjoy his content here, go read some of his poetry at https://aleksisfaust.wordpress.com/, give him a follow! You won’t regret it. 

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  • At what age did you start writing poetry?
    • The first time poem I ever wrote that wasn’t some kind of English assignment, was in my 8th grade Science class. I was 14 years old.
  • Who were your greatest influences?
    • Besides other poets, I was heavily influenced by lyricists like Dani Filth and Marilyn Manson, as well as contemporary rap artists.
  • How much did personal experience affect it then, versus how it does now?
    • I think when I was younger, most of what I did was confessional poetry, as a kind of cathartic process. Now, I have more fun with, and even though my personal life always influences me – it doesn’t lord over my work.
  • What inspires you to write?
    • Literally anything. Usually the works of other artists, particularly films and other visual mediums.
  • Have you ever tried your hand at prose, and would you ever consider writing a short story or a novel?
    • I have actually; two unfinished pieces of prose are currently sitting in my hard drive. I don’t know if I’d ever be able to write a full length novel, but I would love to get to that point someday.
  • What is your ultimate goal for yourself and your writing?
    • I want to revive poetry for this era, and I want to share my work with as many people as I can, both while I’m here and when I’m gone.
  • Do you feel like poetry is a respected art form?
    • I think the “classics” are respected, such as Poe, Keats, Milton etc. but not necessarily contemporary poets. Spoken word and rap are the only subsets of verse that are getting any shine, in my opinion.
  • Which poets make your top list?
    • Charles Baudelaire, Charles Bukowski, Arthur Rimbaud, Sylvia Plath, Anne Sexton, Saul Williams, my husband, and Charles Simic to name a few. (Why are there so many good poets named Charles?) side note to my readers: this is especially funny because I am his husband and all of the men on my dad’s side are named Charles.
  • Would you say that you have settled into a style, or are you still experimenting?
    • I think my most comfortable style is a modern, more musical twist on free-verse, but I don’t think any writer should restrict themselves to only one style. Experimenting in other forms teaches you more about your craft and facilitates creativity.
  • What would you say is the most interesting thing about you?
    • I don’t think I can point out a singular, ruling characteristic to describe myself. I think if I was able to do that, I’d be pretty boring 😛
  • What is a day in the life of a poet like?
    • Well I’m not sipping wine from a goblet, hunched over parchment by candlelight with a quill and ink if that’s what you’re asking. I’m also not living in a coffee shop with a beret and a cigarette tape between my fingers either. xD
  • Do you think anyone can be a poet?
    • I think anyone can write poetry.
  • If you could give a piece of advice to someone who was just starting out, what would it be?
    • 1) Only say what’s necessary. 2) Whatever you say, say it in a way that’s never been said before. 3) Don’t ever force it.
  • In what direction do you see poetry as an art form heading?
    • I think spoken word will continue to be hijacked by social activism and rap will continue to develop into weirder and more unique content. As that happens, I think we will see a reemergence of appreciation for written verse.
  • What are some of your other interests?
    • I’m really into alternative rap, “artsy-films” , and recently rekindled my love for videogames. Basically, I never go outside during the day.
  • Are there any countries you would like to visit that you think would inspire you?
    • Sure, Romania, France, Germany, Russia, and Italy all have aesthetics I would kill to see in person.
  • Do you ever take inspiration from current events?
    • Sometimes, but usually it’s something non-political. I like to stay aware of social issues, but I think those issues are best articulated through discourse rather than poetry, where it can sometimes get to abstracted.
  • If so, how well does a dramatic event or social concept translate into poetry?
    • I think it’s much easier to write about a dramatic event than a social concept. For example, one could certainly write a moving piece about the humanity (or lack thereof) in Ferguson, but it would be much harder to unpack white privilege and the history of racism within power structures like the police force in a single poem.
  • Is there a poet in your life (someone you know personally) who you look up to?
    • Can I say my husband without sounding like a sycophant? Honestly he’s the only person I know personally whose poetry I’ve read and deemed professional.
  • What do you feel makes a poem ‘fresh’?
    • Just about anything you can choose as a topic has been written about before, so the key is to take whatever that is, and try to flip it on its head or change the perspective. One of the best ways to do this is to experiment with imagery and metaphor.
  • If you were to have your poems illustrated and could hire anyone dead or alive, whose art would you use?
    • It’s cruel to make me just pick one, but H.R. Giger is the first one that came to mind.
  • If you could capture your philosophy in one word, what would it be?
  • Satanism.
  • Do you prefer to have your work honestly critiqued or blindly adored?
    • Honestly critiqued.
  • What inspired you to go professional with your writing?
    • I just didn’t see the point in expressing myself creatively if I wasn’t going to share it with anyone. Why write at all if you’re the only one who is going to read it?
  • What gives you the drive to continue?
    • The encouragement of my husband and the opinion of others whose opinion I respect.
  • What would you consider to be a ‘stereotypical’ poet?
    • Nowadays, a young, twenty-something who only performs in front of a mic with a perpetual upward inflection and an irritating lack of breath control.
  • If not drinking and smoking (and other stereotypical poet behaviors) what would you name your vices?
    • Attention, love, and sex.
  • Sum up the ‘greats’ of poetry in one word.
  • Encompassing.
  • What are the absolute “Don’t’s!” of writing poetry?
    • DO NOT rhyme something simply because you can.
    • DON’T say anything that is already implied/obvious.
    • DO NOT force anything to come out of you that isn’t there. It’s contrived. If you’ve heard something said similarly, by anyone else, don’t say it.
    • DON’T underestimate subtlety and purposeful restriction.
    • DON’T become so abstract that no one can discern a meaning.
    • DON’T try to adopt a style that you aren’t suited for just because you admire it. Play around with it, but if it’s hindering your content – move on.
    • DON’T doubt your work.
    • NEVER delete anything without consulting an honest reviewer/friend.
  • I hear you have an incredibly handsome husband. On a scale of 1 – Adonis, how sexual is he?
  • Satan.

DRAMS – Drumming up some hype!

Hello my darlings! Are you excited for “Drams”? It is coming up very, very soon! I’ve been on fire with this project, working on it for hours at a time like it’s my full time job (which, actually, it is right now). As promised I am going to have some lovely merch and freebies for you soon, but until then, you know you want a little taste.

That’s why I’m going to do this – SUBSCRIBE to my newsletter (HERE) and on Monday (September 1st) anyone who is subscribed will receive an exclusive sneak peek in their email inbox. You have until midnight on Sunday to receive this sweet, sweet peek… so don’t hesitate! Click the link before this post gets lost in cyberspace! 

I will not be posting this sample on my blog. This could very well be your only chance to get a look at the action before it hits stores. 

Oh, and did I mention that anyone who is subscribed to my newsletter will also be the first to see the new merchandise, and will receive a 20% off or more coupon as long as other amazing deals? It doesn’t stop there – it only gets more delicious! 

So don’t be shy – SUBSCRIBE now!! The clock is ticking!